Tikkun Olam at Temple Beth Am

Connecting our congregation to social action opportunities


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3/18 Temple Beth Am Tikkun Olam Teach-In: Homelessness and Economic Injustice

We hope you can join us on March 18th for the Temple Beth Am Tikkun Olam Teach-In:  Homelessness and Economic Injustice.  To register for the lunch and/or Advocacy 101 with Nancy Amidei please go to:

http://templebetham.wufoo.com/forms/tikkun-olam-teachin/

Learn and share what we can do as individuals and as a community to respond to homelessness and economic injustice.

Sunday Morning Forum: The History and Landscape of Homelessness in Washington
10:00 – 11:30 AM
Laurie Lippold, Moderator; Alison Eisinger, Executive Director, Seattle/King County Coalition on Homelessness; Megan Gibbard, Executive Director, Teen Feed; Bill Block, King County Committee to End Homelessness; and Youth Speaker, the Mockingbird Society

Luncheon and Discussion: Advocacy as Part of the Jewish Directive to Engage in Tikkun Olam
12:00 – 1:00 PM
Led by Rabbi Beth Singer, Senior Rabbi, Temple Beth Am
Pre-order lunch using this form for $8. A limited number of lunches will be available the day of for $10.

Training: Homeless Advocacy 101
1:00 – 3:00 PM
You are guaranteed to leave this training inspired and with tools to impact your legislators and government leaders. Led by Nancy Amidei, Civic Engagement Project, University of Washington

Tikkun Olam Information Fair
9:30 AM – 1:00 PM
An opportunity to learn about our community partners, Temple Beth Am Tikkun Olam committees and programs, volunteer opportunities and advocacy efforts.

You are welcome to come to all or part of the Teach-In. Sign up for Lunch and Advocacy 101 is required. Sponsored by: Temple Beth Am Tikkun Olam Committee. Email rsimon28@comcast.net with any questions.

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The Ripple Effect – Little Projects with Big Results

On October 17, the Sunday Forum presented opportunities for Beth Am members to give a hand up, not a mere hand out, to undeveloped communities throughout the Third World. Speakers from the local chapter of Engineers Without Borders , Water 1st, and Pangea shared common visions with Beth Am members.

Poverty, disease, and child mortality are preventible when development efforts, beginning with basics, are rooted in the needs of the impoverished communities, as identified by those communities. When members of those communities are involved in identifying and building infrastructure, the infrastructure and projects can be sustainable. To best accomplish local development, Water 1st, Engineers Without Borders and Pangea all find that the active involvement and empowerment of women as community leaders is essential to successful and sustainable projects. Continue reading